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Your End-of-Year Tech List: Closing Out Your Digital Classroom


Your End-of-Year Tech List:
Closing Out Your Digital Classroom



Just as you close out your physical classroom for the year, you should also close out your digital classroom.  To help you do so, we have created the following Tech List, with helpful links and hints.

Task
Tips
Helpful Links

Google Classrooms
Archive your Google classrooms to prevent students from unmonitored posting.  
If you delete a class, you no longer have access to posts or its associated resources.

Edmodo Classrooms
Archive your Edmodo classrooms to prevent students from unmonitored posting.
If you delete a class, you no longer have access to posts or its associated resources.

Google Drive
(Students)
Have students create a folder labeled 2017-18 and drag all of their
current docs and folders into it to “clean-up” their drive.

Google Drive
(Teachers)
Take some time to organize your drive using folders and color coding.

FlipGrid
Freeze your FlipGrids to prevent students from unmonitored posting.

Chromebooks
(Elementary)
Student profiles need to be deleted, broken Chromebooks reported via Helpstar,
and all carts stored in one secured location.

Gmail
Delete/organize/archive your email.

Leaving your school or the county
Teachers who are leaving CCPS need to download their Google Drive files
(if larger than 15 gb) or transfer (if less than 15 gb)
and/or transfer ownership to a department chair or colleague if they require access.  
Students who are leaving CCPS will need to download their Google files to take with them.
While it may take a few moments to organize and pack-up your digital classroom, your time spent will be rewarded when you begin your new year with ease. Have a wonderful summer!

Author Information

Beth Sepelyak has been with Chesterfield County Public Schools for 15 years.  She has been an integrator for the past 11 years. Beth, her three children, parents, and grandparents all attended Grange Hall Elementary, are proud graduates of CCPS, and are staunch advocates of its excellence.

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